Stories & News

Young Chef Day Camp Gave Campers a Sweet Week

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Stories from The Patch | 0 comments

Young Chef Day Camp Gave Campers a Sweet Week

This summer, The Cabbage Patch hosted its first ever cooking summer camp. Each morning, participants in the Young Chef Day Camp prepared a meal for that day: and their cuisine, included dishes from Italy, China and India. Young Chef Day Camp allowed campers to make decisions, use problem solving skills and involve a lot of subjects. Reading, vocabulary, science, health, art and nutrition were all part of the cooking process, which made learning fun. The camp kicked off with cooking breakfast food such as eggs and apple strudel muffins with Leslie Ellis. Throughout the week campers also took field trips to 610 Magnolia, The Comfy Cow and Schimpff’s Confectionary. At 610 Magnolia, the children and youth enjoyed a day of fine dining.  Edward Lee, Chef and owner, also winner on the Food Network’s Iron Chef and a fan favorite on Top Chef Texas, Season 9, gave the campers a tour of 610 Magnolia and then treated them to a three-course meal. “Their three-course meal included corn soup, chicken, green beans on top of potatoes and had chocolate mousse for dessert. He then kindly provided signed menus made especially for the Cabbage Patch campers,” said Elizabeth Smith, Recreation & Youth Development Specialist for The Cabbage Patch. At the Comfy Cow on Frankfort Avenue campers got a tour, complimentary sundaes and had the opportunity to ask co-owner, Tim Koons-McGee questions. At Schimpff’s Confectionary campers got a tour of their candy museum and got to see Red Hots and chocolate made. On “Italian Day”, the menu prepared included meatballs, parmesan garlic bread and rainbow salads. The children made their own meatballs and cut the veggies for the salad with chef volunteer, Mary Wheatley of cookwithmary.com. On “Chinese Day” the menu included a chicken dish, fried rice and almond cookies. In addition, on “Indian Day” campers learned about vegetarian and vegan cuisine and then cooked chickpea curry, mint chutney and a rice dish. Campers finished up their week with a cake decorating lesson and made chicken nuggets from scratch.  Young Chef Day Camp was hands-on and results oriented, so at the end of the week the campers whisked away with valuable skills in following directions, working with their peers and a sense of accomplishment....

read more

“Some of the Most Engaging Years of My Life”

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013 in Alumni Stories, Stories from The Patch | 0 comments

“Some of the Most Engaging Years of My Life”

Vernon Wolfork began attending The Cabbage Patch as a 15-year-old in 1994. “It is hard to believe the amount of programs I did in the relatively short amount of time I was there,” he said. “I started off just roaming the halls, playing pool, and going on canoe trips. But my first summer, someone saw potential in me. I was hired on the Fun Club staff: my first job with my own paycheck. After summer, I became involved in the High Adventure Club, Patch Poets, Teen Club, Drama Club, Photojournalism program, and others.” Vernon’s involvement in Drama Club and Photojournalism Program allowed him the experience of performing in the Kentucky Center for the Arts and to spend a summer at a WKU in the photojournalism program. Vernon went on to attend WKU, UofL, and then became an Army AH-64D Helicopter Pilot. Today, Vernon is a Captain in the U.S. Army. “Outside of my family I tended to be a wall flower. Once I started getting involved with The Patch, I had to come out of my shell,” Vernon said. “I was put in leadership roles, and expected to make judgment calls on the spot. The Patch fostered a sense of accomplishment, not because of the recognition but because it was contagious. I found as I did better my peers stepped up with me… I was not alone in failure or success.” Vernon described The Cabbage Patch as the epitome of a “Melting Pot.” “The history is as rich as the future I came to know—some of my most engaging years as an adolescent. The history was not just in the buildings or the photos but in the stories of the mix of families that went and continue to participate there,” he said. “The Patch fostered a sense of accomplishment, not because of the recognition but because it was contagious. I found as I did better my peers stepped up with me… I was not alone in failure or success.” “I can look back on my years there and wish I could go back and do it again because it was such a great time,” he said. “However, I have found a way to keep ‘Winning in Life’ even away from The Patch. I have become actively involved in giving other children a chance to experience what I have through camping, tee ball, reading clubs, and mentor­ship. I have two sons of my own, two nephews, a niece and 100 soldiers I am responsible for. I make it a point to demonstrate the skills I learned while at The Patch, whether it is cooperation skills learned during High Adventure or organization skills and patience from trying to round up 15-20 first and second graders for a field trip.”...

read more

Medieval Day Camp Teaches Patchers “Noble Ways”

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013 in Stories from The Patch | 0 comments

Medieval Day Camp Teaches Patchers “Noble Ways”

Medieval Day camp gave Cabbage Patchers a week of  learning about fencing (safely, with foam “swords”of course), catapulting and “noble ways” including heraldry. This first-year camp, allowed Educational Opportunities to add something new for returning campers. Overall, the camp was focused on teaching art and history. Campers learned about heraldry and what the symbols and colors used in medieval times represented. Then they were able to design their own heraldry based on how they each wanted to be seen. One of the activities during the week included making their own catapults from wood, nails and PVC pipe. Experimenting and trying new things was essential to building a successful  catapult. Children and youth in the Medieval Camp also brought out their culinary skills at the end of the week and cooked for 39 people in Holladay Hall, including their parents, another camp group and each other. The meal they prepared included roasted chicken and root vegetables: food items used in Medieval times. In addition, “medieval mac and cheese” was made for the picky eaters, Mayghin Levine, Manger of Educational Opportunities, said. Since the campers had been talking about sanitation, they decided to call their brownies “mud pies.” The power of “knightly and noble ways” became clear on the first day of camp, when one boy was misbehaving and almost got in a fight. A counselor-in-training pulled him aside to talk about his behavior. “He told him he had to act like a knight, and after that the camper was one of the best behaved kids throughout the rest of the camp,” Mayghin said. That camper was not the only one who walked away with more “knightly ways,”  by the second day of camp many of the campers were encouraging each other, to be more, “knightly” and “act more...

read more

Cabbage Patch Garden Grows Thanks to Girl Scout Volunteers

Posted by on Jun 25, 2013 in Stories from The Patch | 0 comments

Cabbage Patch Garden Grows Thanks to Girl Scout Volunteers

The courtyard at The Cabbage Patch Settlement House was bestowed with beautiful beds of new flowers, thanks to a special project coordinated by 6th and 7th graders from St. Margaret Mary Catholic School & Highlands Latin School who are members of Girl Scout Troop #233. “The Girl Scout Silver Award is earned at the Cadette Level in Girl Scouting,” said Sherri Sprau, GS Troop #233’s leader.  “The girls must follow the award guidelines, as outlined by our local Kentuckiana Council, to complete a community service project. They are encouraged to find out what the needs in their community are and to look for issues that compliment the need with their own areas of interest. Our Girl Scouts met and presented a number of community service project ideas, and after much consideration, decided to build raised garden beds for a local organization.” The Girl Scout Troop chose The Cabbage Patch as the recipient of this project because they wanted the project to benefit children their own age. The project took three days to complete: on the first day, the Girl Scout volunteers built the flowerbeds and filled them with soil; on day two they planted flowers; and on day three they put down weed cloth and more mulch on all three beds. The Cabbage Patch thanks Girl Scout Troop #233 for enhancing the beauty of our courtyard and giving our children, youth, and adults a piece of nature to enjoy! See more photos of this volunteer project on...

read more

Secret Garden Day Camp: Plant filled baskets, bright scarves and an experience they will never forget

Posted by on Jun 24, 2013 in Stories from The Patch | 0 comments

Secret Garden Day Camp: Plant filled baskets, bright scarves and an experience they will never forget

Summer camps kicked off the week of June 10 at the Patch. The Secret Garden Day Camp for children ages 9-16 unlocked the secret wonder of plants through field trips to Oxmoor Farm (The Food Literacy Project), Suzy’s Clay Studio, Louisville Science Center, Bernheim Forest and the Falls of the Ohio. At Oxmoor Farm, campers picked, planted and then cooked plants including strawberries, kale and beets; then they planted tomatoes and cooked omelets. The food festivities did not end there, campers also baked bread and shook cream until it became butter. Along with food fun and cooking an herbal feast, there were crafts to channel the campers’ creativity. Campers studied the art of Henna, wove baskets out of the reed plant, dyed silk scarves with lac bugs and painted with the yucca and mulberry plants. To finish up the week, campers made plants into herbal lotion, grapefruit lotion bars and cosmetics.  Elizabeth Smith, a Recreation & Youth Development Specialist for The Cabbage Patch, said her favorite part was the end result of all of their hard work, “This camp is very tangible, campers get to see what they accomplished and I love to see how excited they are.” The campers learned about plants as food, as dyes and products, Elizabeth said. Campers walked away from Secret Garden Day Camp with plant filled baskets, bright scarves and an experience they will never forget. See more photos on Facebook. ...

read more